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Summary

Both my doctoral (Inserm U.980, Faculty of Medicine Necker, Paris Descartes, Paris, France) and postdoctoral work (Cornell Hospital and then the Rockefeller University, New York, USA) aimed at identifying the human genetic factors involved in the natural history of infectious diseases. This pioneer work opened new avenues of research in the field of human mycobacterial diseases and was a critical step in the validation of the genetic theory of infectious diseases initially proposed by the laboratory. My understanding of such a huge switch in paradigm (from ‘no infection without a microbe’ to ‘no infection without a genetic lesion’) is that the contribution of genetics to any human characteristics is major and as a rule underestimated when not just dogmatically ignored. In addition, a clear outcome of this theory is that extreme phenotypes are caused by severe genetic defects in a single gene (or pathway), while more common phenotypes are caused by the additive effects of minor lesions in a potentially large number of genes. Stated differently, with respect to a given phenotype each individual carries a quantitatively different information and the most efficient way to capture the genetically most informative individuals is to focus on those with the most extreme phenotypes. This is also of great practical relevance since 1) by definition the sample size will be limited and 2) the needed experimental tools are molecular in essence (as opposed to the study of common phenotypes that typically require large sample size and statistical approaches). Building on this convincing evidence that even infectious diseases long considered as purely environmental are indeed under critical genetic control of the host, I hypothesize that the vast majority of human behavioral traits are, at least in part, driven by the host genetic profile.

Experiences

Current Experience

  • Team Lead
    Since January 2016

  • senior research associate
    Since October 2011
    Whipple’s disease & Human Behavioral Genetics

Past Experience

  • senior research associate
    January 2011 --- January 2015

  • Research associate
    January 2012 --- January 2014

  • Research associate
    September 2010 --- July 2012
    Whipple’s disease

  • Postdoctoral Researcher
    January 2007 --- August 2010
    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Human Macrophages : In vitro differentiation of human macrophages with enhanced antimycobacterial activity

Knowledge

LinkedIn Assessment :
molecular biologyCell biologyCell CultureWestern BlottingBiochemistryCellPCRIn VivoLifesciencesImmunologyImmunohistochemistryIn VitroHuman Behavioral GeneticsGender dysphoriaPrimary Premature EjaculationSexual BehaviorHuman GeneticspedophiliaGenomicsLife SciencesGenetics

Education

  • Thesis, Ph.D in Inherited disorder of human IFNGR2 : complementation by inhibitors of glycosylation from : Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Necker-Enfants Malades Medical School Univers in 2006
  • DEA (MSc) in Molecular Biology of the Cell and Genetic from University of Paris XI, ORSAY, France & Institut Pasteur in 2002
  • Magistère (BSc) in Genetics from University Paris VII, JUSSIEU, France in 2001
  • Licence (BSc) in Cellular Biology and Physiology from University of Paris XI, ORSAY, France in 2000
  • in PCEM1 (first cycle medical studies)/DEUG – SV from University of Paris XI, ORSAY, France in 1999
  • Baccalauréat-High School Diploma in Scientific – SVT from Lycée Sainte Marie - La croix (Antony, 92), France in 1996
  • French Baccalaureat in General Scientific from Lycée Sainte Marie - La croix (Antony, 92), France in 1995
  • - in Elementary School from Lycée Sainte Marie - La croix (Antony, 92), France in 1989
  • Kindergartens / Elementary school in - from Ecole notre dame de l'assomption (Verrières le Buisson, 91, France)[ in 1988

Area / Region

France

Others

Driving License
  • No